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Heavenly Plum Clafoutis

Heavenly Plum Clafoutis

I served this Heavenly Plum Clafoutis at the Food For Thought dinner I hosted in the UK on the 5th October.  It is a very easy dish to make and wonderful to share with friends or someone who is caring for a loved one with […]

Adrienne, Please make Moussaka!

Adrienne, Please make Moussaka!

This story and recipe for Moussaka from the Cooking with Adrienne book embodies so many memories of cooking with Adrienne.  I made this for a dinner party for the #FoodForThought2017 campaign yesterday. And I share it with you now in the final few days of […]

Lemon Rosemary Chicken and Potatoes

Lemon Rosemary Chicken and Potatoes

This post from the very early days of the blog seems especially appropriate for the Food For Thought campaign to #EndFTD dementia.  It is a lovely dish to share with friends, especially nice to bring to someone suffering from Frontotemporal Degeneration dementia.  Those with FTD often also have a condition which makes it difficult for them to swallow but this braise tenderizes the ingredients making them much easier to enjoy. Our sense of taste and smell are the most powerful triggers for memory.  The smell of the rosemary and lemon in this dish was another reason this deserved to be re-posted for the Food For Thought campaign.  If you can help support the fundraiser please click on the link below, but either way share this dish with someone you love.

Support Food For Thought  

When the recipe for Lemon Rosemary Chicken and Potatoes from Ed Giobbi, author of Italian Family Cooking, appeared in House & Garden Magazine in the early Seventies Adrienne quickly made it her own.  It became a mainstay in her repertoire especially when she had to cook for a crowd, as she often did on weekends spent at her husband’s family home on Long Island.   Rosemary is a favored herb and it pairs perfectly with the chicken and potatoes.Chicken and rosemary potatoes in pot

The original recipe called for using rosemary branches but during the braise the needles dispersed into the sauce and were tough and unappealing when eating the finished dish.  I struggled with how to get around this and still keep it a fairly easy dish.  Putting the rosemary branches in cheesecloth was fussy and the flavor didn’t infuse into the potatoes and sauce.  In the end I got my resident chopper – my husband – to mince the rosemary.  It worked perfectly.  If you do it yourself, mince more than is required for the recipe and freeze it.  It freezes really well and you can use it without thawing.

I also added leeks and a lemon rind which I think work well with the chicken and rosemary flavors. Don’t use a lemon with the juice in it because the juice will inhibit the cooking of the potatoes.  The rind is edible after being cooked and adds a surprising bite to the dish.  And to make it a complete one dish meal I tossed in Chantenay carrots .  They keep the dish easy too because they are already the perfect size and don’t need peeling.

Lemon Chicken with Rosemary and Potatoes

October 4, 2017
: 6-8 Servings

An easy one-pot dish with bright lemon and rosemary flavors.

By:

Ingredients
  • 4 chicken thighs and 4 breasts, salted 24 hours in advance
  • 6 garlic cloves, unpeeled
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 3 tbsp. butter
  • 1 cup white cooking wine
  • 10 sprigs fresh rosemary, leaves picked and minced
  • 2 Bay leaves
  • 2 leeks, halved lengthwise and sliced ¼ “thick
  • 10 medium potatoes sliced ¼” thick, use a combination of Yukon Gold and Red Bliss, peeled or not as you prefer
  • 1 cup +/- homemade chicken stock as needed
Directions
  • Step 1 Pre-heat oven to 350 F
  • Step 2 Heat the olive oil and butter over moderate heat in a casserole that can later be used in the oven, or sauté everything on the stove in a skillet and then transfer to a foil pan for the oven cooking. Add the garlic cloves and thighs. After turning the thighs add the breasts. Cook them lightly on both sides. Season with pepper. Add the leeks and cook until lightly colored. Add wine, rosemary and bay leaves. Cover and simmer for 3 minutes. Remove cover, raise heat and boil rapidly. When wine has reduced by half, remove chicken to a platter. Add potatoes, salt & pepper and chicken stock if necessary to cover potatoes.
  • Step 3 Cover and bake in oven mixing often for a total of 35 – 40 minutes. After 20 minutes add dark meat. After 30 minutes add white meat. The potatoes will break up and you should even encourage this when you stir the mixture. Add stock as needed. The sauce should not be soupy but the dish should be moist. Remove the bay leaves and the garlic skins and crush the cooked garlic into the liquid.
  • Step 4 If your sauce is too soupy remove the dish from the oven. Pour the sauce off to a sauce pan and boil furiously until you get the right texture and taste.
  • Step 5 To reheat if made ahead, remove the chicken pieces and add stock if necessary – the potatoes will have absorbed quite a bit of the liquid. Add the chicken pieces back for the last 10 minutes.

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Kubaneh Bread – Yemeni Pull-Apart Rolls

Kubaneh Bread – Yemeni Pull-Apart Rolls

This recipe for Kubaneh Bread – Yemeni Pull-Apart Rolls – is not from the Cooking with Adrienne book but I am sharing it for the Food For Thought campaign.  First, because I know Adrienne would love it and second, I thought it would be the perfect thing to […]

Homemade Hummus

Homemade Hummus

Amaze your friends with this easy and delish recipe for homemade hummus and help support the Food For Thought campaign to support those with FTD Dementia – Adrienne’s Dementia. Support Food For Thought I never knew how easy it was to make homemade hummus but […]

Summer Tomato Salad

Summer Tomato Salad

In August and September, when the tomatoes are abundant, we gorge ourselves on this Summer Tomato Salad because we know that the time for eating it at its best is finite. The salad epitomizes the best things of summer – the warmth of the sun, the sweet acidity of vine-ripened tomatoes, the crunch of sweet Vidalia onions, and the licorice taste of basil – all swimming in a perfectly balanced vinaigrette.

This simple recipe comes with a storied history. In 1965 Adrienne decided she wanted to take cooking lessons in France. Not knowing how to go about finding a teacher, she picked up the phone and called Craig Claiborne, the food critic for the New York Times (whom she did not know at the time), to ask for a recommendation. He gave her Julia Child’s number. Yes, that Julia Child. Unfortunately, Julia was living in the States at the time, but she recommended one of her co-authors of Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Simone (Simca) Beck. Simca had homes in Provence near Cannes and in Paris where she had a cooking school. She taught Adrienne the basics of French cooking and culture and they became good friends.

One sunny afternoon Adrienne invited Simca to a poolside lunch at a house they were renting in Mougin, France. She served a fresh summer tomato salad as the first course. Simca proceeded to remove the skin from each slice of tomato with her knife and fork before she ate them. “The skins are not appealing and the tomato absorbs the vinaigrette better without them.” She explained that the easiest way to remove the tomato skins before preparing the salad was to quickly blanch them in hot water and peel the skins away. To this day it is how we prepare the tomatoes for the salad.  If you love this recipe please consider supporting the Food For Thought campaign to build awareness for the dementia that has stolen Adrienne’s ability to communicate or cook.

Help End FTD

In this recipe the measurements for the oil and vinegar are not given and what you end up with may not align with the classic 3:1 ratio for a vinaigrette. This is because the dressing will be influenced by the sweetness and acidity of the tomatoes. So each time you must taste, taste, taste to get the balance correct. You should use the best-quality vinegar and olive oil here because their taste will shine against the tomatoes.

Summer Tomato Salad

September 27, 2017
: 4
: Easy

In this recipe the measurements for the oil and vinegar are not given and what you end up with may not align with the classic 3:1 ratio for a vinaigrette. This is because the dressing will be influenced by the sweetness and acidity of the tomatoes. So each time you must taste, taste, taste to get the balance correct. You should use the best-quality vinegar and olive oil here because their taste will shine against the tomatoes.

By:

Ingredients
  • 6 to 8 large beefsteak or other meaty tomatoes
  • Good-quality balsamic vinegar
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 Vidalia or other sweet onion, sliced very thin
  • Sea salt
  • Sherry vinegar
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 large handfuls fresh basil leaves
  • 1 large semolina baguette, sliced
  • 2 (8-ounce) fresh buffalo mozzarella balls (not the rubbery ones), sliced
Directions
  • Step 1 Bring a large pot of water to the boil. Half fill a large bowl with cold water. Make a small “X” in the skin of each tomato at the end opposite to the stem (where there is a small black dot or sometimes a series of irregular round black bumps). This will help the skin to peel off easily. Blanch 3 or 4 tomatoes in the boiling water for 3 to 5 minutes. You will see the skin crack and peel. Remove immediately and place in the cold water. Repeat with remaining tomatoes.
  • Step 2 With a paring knife, peel the skin off the tomatoes and remove the stem and any white pith. Slice the tomatoes horizontally approximately ½ inch thick and layer them in a wide shallow serving bowl. Sprinkle each layer with balsamic and sherry vinegar, oil, some of the onion, and salt.
  • Step 3 When you have all the tomatoes sliced, taste the liquid in the bowl for the oil/vinegar sweet/acid balance. Add more sherry vinegar and olive oil, as well as salt and pepper, as necessary. Unlike most salads, the dressing should pool in the bottom of the bowl. You should have about ½ cup of dressing in the bowl by the time you serve the salad. Taste again. If you are not sure about the balance, let the salad sit for 10 minutes to allow the juices of the tomatoes and the onions to blend with the oil and vinegar. Taste again for seasoning.
  • Step 4 Chiffonade (chop or cut with scissors into fine strips) the basil and sprinkle on the salad just before serving. If you chop the basil before making the salad it will get discolored, so wait until just before serving. I find scissors are easier than a knife: Remove the leaves from each branch and stack them into piles. Fold the pile of leaves in half along the spine and, starting at the tip, scissor them into thin strips.
  • Step 5 To Serve
  • Step 6 Spoon some of the dressing from the bowl onto a slice of semolina bread, add a slice of buffalo mozzarella, then smother it with the tomatoes and more dressing and get ready for nirvana!
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Food For Thought

Food For Thought

The Cooking With Adrienne Blog will be devoted to the Food for Thought (#FFT) campaign from 25th September to 9th October. The FFT campaign is raising awareness and funding a cure for Adrienne’s Dementia – Frontotemporal Degeneration. Please help us #EndFTD Dementia! Support Food For Thought […]

Michael’s Mayonnaise

Michael’s Mayonnaise

My husband makes the mayonnaise in our house and that’s why it is called Michael’s Mayonnaise!  He makes it for no other reason but that he likes making it and it tastes so good!  He started out using the recipe in Mastering French Cooking because […]

Troisgros Tomato Vinaigrette

Troisgros Tomato Vinaigrette

The Troisgros brothers have a great affinity for using vinegar in their cooking and Adrienne took that to heart.  This wonderfully simple Troisgros Tomato Vinaigrette is more sauce than emulsion and is perfect on Sea Bass or to dress up any simply cooked fish.  You can even use it to brighten grilled vegetables.  It is unbelievably easy and you will find it becomes your go-to sauce for easy weekday meals.

Troisgros Tomato Vinaigrette

August 20, 2017
: 1 3/4 cups

A simple sauce of tomatoes, vinegar and olive oil for which you will find a myriad of uses.

By:

Ingredients
  • 2 tbsp. white wine vinegar
  • ½ tsp. freshly ground pepper
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 tbsp. chopped Italian parsley
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup peeled chopped fresh tomatoes or tinned Italian tomatoes
Directions
  • Step 1 In a mixing bowl, combine the vinegar, pepper, salt and parsley. Whisk in the olive oil. Add the tomatoes and stir to blend.
  • Step 2 Leftover sauce can be kept refrigerated for a few days.
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Blueberry Polenta Upside Down Cake

Blueberry Polenta Upside Down Cake

Easy Blueberry Polenta Cake is a lovely alternative to the traditional dessert. The polenta gives it a nutty taste and is lighter than you would expect. Share this with your friends

Flaky Tart Pastry

Flaky Tart Pastry

Adrienne gave me Rose Levy Beranbaum’s Pie and Pastry Bible for Christmas one year and afterward I abandoned all other recipes for flaky tart pastry.  This recipe takes all the guesswork out of making pastry and, though the process is a bit unusual, it requires […]

OMG Beurre Blanc!

OMG Beurre Blanc!

Many experienced home chefs cringe at the thought of making a beurre blanc sauce, as I did.  The first time I made it I didn’t have Adrienne by my side coaching me, I was on my own in my kitchen in New Jersey.  Adrienne and I didn’t start cooking together properly until I moved to Long Island.  But she assured me if I could make a vinaigrette – which I could – then I could make a beurre blanc.  So on a weekend night when the kids were with their Dad I took a deep breath and said ‘Tant Pis’ I want Beurre Blanc!

A beurre blanc is a warm emulsion, rather than a cold one like a vinaigrette.  The warmth keeps the milk solids in the butter suspended.  Too much heat will cause the emulsion to separate into solids and oily clarified butter.  But, thanks to Adrienne and Julia Child, I discovered it is easy to hold it over a very, very low heat while you finish cooking the rest of the meal and then dribble in a few tablespoons of very hot stock or cream before serving.  Do not to try to heat it up once you have it emulsified or it will be ruined and nothing but nothing will restore it.

Most cookbooks will tell you that you cannot re-use beurre blanc but that’s not true.  You cannot reheat it, however if you refrigerate any leftover sauce it will solidify since it is mostly melted butter.  When you want to use it again scoop out a spoonful and dollop it on hot fish or vegetables.  It will melt and no longer be emulsified but it will taste delish.

Beurre Blanc

August 14, 2017
: 1 cup

This recipe is not much changed from the one in Mastering French Cooking which Adrienne gave me in 1993 and has been my go to reference for all things sauce. Adrienne always used vermouth but white wine or lemon juice work just as well.

By:

Ingredients
  • Flavor base:
  • 2 ½ tbsp. white wine vinegar
  • 2 ½ tbsp. vermouth, white wine or lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp. finely minced shallots
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1/8 tsp. white pepper
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • Emulsion:
  • 8 oz. cold unsalted butter cut into 16 pieces
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Lemon juice
Directions
  • Step 1 Flavor Base: In a saucepan boil the liquids, shallots and seasonings with the butter until reduced to approximately 1 ½ tablespoons.
  • Step 2 Emulsion: Remove the saucepan from the heat and whisk in 2 pieces of the cold butter. As the butter creams into the liquid, whisk in another piece. Set the saucepan on very low heat. Continue whisking in successive pieces of butter as the previous one has almost creamed into the sauce until all the butter is incorporated. The sauce will be thick and ivory colored. Immediately remove the pan from the heat and taste. It will need salt and white pepper – so that you don’t have black pepper specks in the sauce – and perhaps a squeeze of lemon.
  • Step 3 Cover the pan and place it near a warm burner or pilot light, but not over direct heat, or set over barely warm water, until you are ready to serve it. Stir it occasionally to insure that it doesn’t separate.
  • Step 4 Just before serving dribble a tablespoon or two of hot stock or cream into the sauce to raise the temperature. You will be serving it on hot food so the sauce itself does not need to be piping hot.
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Do you Chiffonade your basil?

Do you Chiffonade your basil?

The term chiffonade means to slice something into narrow ribbons, the way you would slice cabbage to make coleslaw. This video  will show you how to quickly chiffonade any leafy vegetable or herb into narrow ribbons.  The example we show in the video is with […]

Chop onions quickly without losing a finger!

Chop onions quickly without losing a finger!

Here is the first in a series of simple videos with tips and tricks I learned from Adrienne!   Knife Skills: Chopping & Mincing Onions Quickly chopping or mincing onions is a task you do over and over in the kitchen.  This video shows you […]

The Cooking with Adrienne Book is Published!

The Cooking with Adrienne Book is Published!

During the Food For Thought 2017 campaign to raise awareness for FTD dementia, 100% of the proceeds from the sale of the book will be contributed to The AFTD.  Please help support those with FTD dementia – Adrienne’s dementia – September 25th – October 9th.

Get Cooking with Adrienne Here!

As I was writing Cooking with Adrienne it became clear that in addition to being a cookbook this is also the amazing, often hilarious, story of a woman who became the American doyenne of French cuisine from the Sixties through the Nineties.  Her recipes were based on the food coming out of the kitchens of Alain Chapel, Frédy Girardet, Michel Guérard, Jean and Pierre Troisgros, Roger Verge and others who were creating the New French Cuisine.  She became an accomplished home cook and helped to pave the way for many of these chefs to bring the New Cuisine to America.  Adrienne first began cooking in Paris with Simone (Simca) Beck, co-author, with Julia Child, of Mastering the Art of French Cooking.  See the story Fluting Mushrooms on the Bidet for a good laugh and insight into Adrienne’s single mindedness! 

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Sauce Parisienne…Old School or Retro Cool??

Sauce Parisienne…Old School or Retro Cool??

  I recently had to replace my copy of Mastering The Art of French Cooking because the spine had split  and the pages were falling out.   While flipping through my shiny new copy I came across a sauce Adrienne and I had never made: […]

Q&A with Michel Guerard

Q&A with Michel Guerard

One of Adrienne’s favorite chefs, Michel Guérard, is interviewed by Time Magazine, 40 years after he first appeared on the cover.  But Adrienne first tasted his food five years prior to that… she always was ahead of the curve! Here he reveals his current thoughts […]

Mis en Place…What’s That?

Mis en Place…What’s That?

Everything in its Place ~ Mis en Place

The French term mis en place (pronounced MEEZ ahn plahs) comes from professional kitchens and refers to the process of getting everything ready to cook.  Home cooks can take a page from the pros here because, although it takes time to prepare your ingredients to be cooked, it will speed up the cooking process enormously.

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Michel Guerard’s Warm Tomato Tart

Michel Guerard’s Warm Tomato Tart

Michel Guerard’s recipe for a delicious and easy warm tomato tart is the perfect way to use up the last of the summer tomatoes and basil.   Adrienne loved Michel’s food and loved tomatoes – so this is a match made in heaven! I think plum […]

Tartare de Legumes or Cool Summer Vegetables

Tartare de Legumes or Cool Summer Vegetables

Adrienne gave me the recipe for Tartare de Legumes 20 years ago when I was complaining to her that I couldn’t get my kids to eat vegetables.  I didn’t make the recipe until just last night…Adrienne clearly didn’t understand what would and wouldn’t appeal to most young […]

Marché Forville destination food market

Marché Forville destination food market

Ever since they started travelling to France, Adrienne had wanted a kitchen to cook the food she was drooling over in every market they visited.  Marché Forville was about to become her destination food market.  In the USA in the late seventies it was still very difficult to get good local produce, free-range chickens or grass fed beef.  But in France every town had a market and every market was local.

Adrienne’s friend and food mentor Simca Beck introduced them to the villages in the hills above Cannes where she had a home.  They fell in love with the area and began renting a house in Mougin called La Calade.Marche Forville June 76 4

Every morning they would drive to the Marché Forville in Cannes to buy ingredients for supper that evening.  The covered market was located in Le Suquet, the old quarter of Cannes. (more…)

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Foodie Friends and Piggy Weekends

Foodie Friends and Piggy Weekends

Every year beginning in 1988 six foodie friends got together for a weekend in The Hamptons and cooked their little foodie hearts out!  It was called the Dewey Lane Eating Club (DLEC) – after the location of the first event.  Adrienne was the architect of the menu and the head […]

Vinegar Roasted Cherry Tomatoes

Vinegar Roasted Cherry Tomatoes

This is a quickie version of the Tomate Provençal recipe from Cooking with Adrienne, Volume I.  If you are like me, towards the end of winter you are bored with root vegetables and the bounty of summer is a long way off.  But you can brighten […]

A day without champagne is like a day without  foie gras!

A day without champagne is like a day without foie gras!

On one of my first trips to France with Adrienne and Martin in the early Nineties, we literally had champagne and foie gras at almost every meal!   Admittedly we were in the Champagne region for the first few days and then in Aquitaine but it all started on the plane. I was travelling in coach in those days and they were in Business Class. Martin ferried glasses of champagne back to me so I wouldn’t feel deprived.   How deprived could I feel on my way to France???

As we progressed from Les Crayeres to Eugenie les Bain and then to Paris we were plied with champagne and foie gras every evening.  But towards the end of the trip we were facing a day without having been offered any champagne  and thus our motto was born!

‘A day without champagne is like a day without foie gras.’

 

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Simple Sea Bass with Sauce Vierge

Simple Sea Bass with Sauce Vierge

We all know we should be eating more fish.  Especially after the holidays most of us are feeling a bit over indulged.  But many people feel that cooking fish can be troublesome: there is the smell, and the bones and the not overcooking it.  And […]

Mousseline de Saumon

Mousseline de Saumon

Adrienne made these lovely menu cards for many of her dinner parties in the late Sixties and Seventies.  As I looked through them I noticed there was a dish that appeared regularly but which Adrienne and I had never made together: Mousseline de Saumon. After a bit of digging […]

Pissaladière Niçoise

Pissaladière Niçoise

pissaladiere tart in Provence

I first had a Pissaladière Niçoise at the restaurant Le Nid d’Aigle, in the mountains above Nice. I loved it and not just because of the picturesque moment captured in the photo!  When I returned (solo) from my escapade I made it  for Adrienne and it became one of our favorites.  The sweetness of the slow-cooked onions contrasts perfectly with the saltiness of the anchovies, the sharpness of the olives and the pungent scent of thyme.  For those of you who are saying eeeewwww to anchovies – they really are a necessary part of the overall taste and without them you just have a lot of sweet onions.  I started out using  Julia Child’s Pissaladière Niçoise recipe but changed it a bit over the years.  I added crumbled bacon for the smoky taste and cherry tomatoes for a bit of acidity.  They are optional but who would say no to bacon?!

It makes a great first course or the main for a luncheon with a salad and cheese course. Mangiare!

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Fluting Mushrooms on the bidet

Fluting Mushrooms on the bidet

I had never heard of ‘fluting’ mushrooms until  Adrienne’s husband told me this story.  In the late Sixties Adrienne took a series of cooking lessons in Paris with Simca Beck, co-author of Mastering the Art of French Cooking.  One day she taught  Adrienne how to flute […]

Craig Claiborne

“In my next life I want to come back as Adrienne and Martin!”  Craig Claiborne was the food editor and restaurant critic for The NY Times and got to know Adrienne and her husband after repeated meetings at restaurants, on airplanes, in cooking events all […]

Ratatouille in winter

Ratatouille in winter

Making ratatouille in the winter may sound perverse but when the ingredients are seasonably available in the summer the last thing you really want to do is spend the afternoon in the kitchen standing over a hot stove.   But now as the days are shorter and the cold weather keeps us indoors, standing over a hot stove is much more appealing.  So I am making Ratatouille today!  I know I am bucking the trend for sourcing locally but in fact I will be using basil and parsley grown on my own windowsill even though the eggplant and zucchini are imported and the tomatoes come from a tin!

Everyone has a recipe for ratatouille or a similar type of long slow braised vegetable dish. This one is probably not dissimilar but the one difference is Adrienne always insisted that each vegetable must be sauteed separately because each one has different properties. The zucchini is full of water which it will exude while cooking.  The eggplant will absorb all the oil in the pan before eventually releasing it and browning.  The onions and garlic are cooked together before adding the tomatoes and their juice.  Finally at the end everything is combined and simmered slowly along with the basil, parsley and most importantly a good dash of vinegar.   Adrienne is a big proponent of using vinegar to cut the sweetness of certain vegetables especially when they have been slow cooked.  You will find that it is an undercurrent in most of the recipes here.

Here is the link for the recipe: Adrienne’s Ratatouille

OR (more…)

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My Diary

Post ID:

Making ratatouille in the winter may sound perverse but when the ingredients are seasonably available in the summer the last thing you really want to do is spend the afternoon in the kitchen standing over a hot stove.   But now as the days are shorter and the cold weather keeps us indoors, standing over a hot stove is much more appealing.  So I am making Ratatouille today!  I know I am bucking the trend for sourcing locally but in fact I will be using basil and parsley grown on my own windowsill even though the eggplant and zucchini are imported and the tomatoes come from a tin!

Everyone has a recipe for ratatouille or a similar type of long slow braised vegetable dish. This one is probably not dissimilar but the one difference is Adrienne always insisted that each vegetable must be sauteed separately because each one has different properties. The zucchini is full of water which it will exude while cooking.  The eggplant will absorb all the oil in the pan before eventually releasing it and browning.  The onions and garlic are cooked together before adding the tomatoes and their juice.  Finally at the end everything is combined and simmered slowly along with the basil, parsley and most importantly a good dash of vinegar.   Adrienne is a big proponent of using vinegar to cut the sweetness of certain vegetables especially when they have been slow cooked.  You will find that it is an undercurrent in most of the recipes here.

Here is the link for the recipe: Adrienne’s Ratatouille

OR (more…)


Quick and Easy

Homemade Hummus

Homemade Hummus

Amaze your friends with this easy and delish recipe for homemade hummus and help support the Food For Thought campaign to support those with FTD Dementia – Adrienne’s Dementia. Support Food For Thought I never knew how easy it was to make homemade hummus but […]

Summer Tomato Salad

Summer Tomato Salad

In August and September, when the tomatoes are abundant, we gorge ourselves on this Summer Tomato Salad because we know that the time for eating it at its best is finite. The salad epitomizes the best things of summer – the warmth of the sun, the […]

Michel Guerard’s Warm Tomato Tart

Michel Guerard’s Warm Tomato Tart

Michel Guerard’s recipe for a delicious and easy warm tomato tart is the perfect way to use up the last of the summer tomatoes and basil.   Adrienne loved Michel’s food and loved tomatoes – so this is a match made in heaven! I think plum […]

Tartare de Legumes or Cool Summer Vegetables

Tartare de Legumes or Cool Summer Vegetables

Adrienne gave me the recipe for Tartare de Legumes 20 years ago when I was complaining to her that I couldn’t get my kids to eat vegetables.  I didn’t make the recipe until just last night…Adrienne clearly didn’t understand what would and wouldn’t appeal to most young […]

Vinegar Roasted Cherry Tomatoes

Vinegar Roasted Cherry Tomatoes

This is a quickie version of the Tomate Provençal recipe from Cooking with Adrienne, Volume I.  If you are like me, towards the end of winter you are bored with root vegetables and the bounty of summer is a long way off.  But you can brighten […]